365
11 Nov 12 at 7 am

collective-history:

A typical 19th century phrenology chart: In the 1820s, phrenologists claimed the mind was located in areas of the brain, and were attacked for doubting that mind came from the nonmaterial soul. Their idea of reading “bumps” in the skull to predict personality traits was later discredited. Phrenology was first called a pseudoscience in 1843 and continues to be considered so.

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

collective-history:

A typical 19th century phrenology chart: In the 1820s, phrenologists claimed the mind was located in areas of the brain, and were attacked for doubting that mind came from the nonmaterial soul. Their idea of reading “bumps” in the skull to predict personality traits was later discredited. Phrenology was first called a pseudoscience in 1843 and continues to be considered so.
 1160
01 Apr 12 at 10 pm

medicalschool:

Spectacular Brain Images Reveal Surprisingly Simple Structure

Stunning new visuals of the brain reveal a deceptively simple pattern of organization in the wiring of this complex organ.

Instead of nerve fibers travelling willy-nilly through the brain like spaghetti, as some imaging has suggested, the new portraits reveal two-dimensional sheets of parallel fibers crisscrossing other sheets at right angles in a gridlike structure that folds and contorts with the convolutions of the brain.

This same pattern appeared in the brains of humans, rhesus monkeys, owl monkeys, marmosets and galagos, researchers report today (March 29) in the journal Science.

» via Live Science

OOOOOOOMMMMMMGGGGGGg

medicalschool:

Spectacular Brain Images Reveal Surprisingly Simple Structure

Stunning new visuals of the brain reveal a deceptively simple pattern of organization in the wiring of this complex organ.
Instead of nerve fibers travelling willy-nilly through the brain like spaghetti, as some imaging has suggested, the new portraits reveal two-dimensional sheets of parallel fibers crisscrossing other sheets at right angles in a gridlike structure that folds and contorts with the convolutions of the brain.
This same pattern appeared in the brains of humans, rhesus monkeys, owl monkeys, marmosets and galagos, researchers report today (March 29) in the journal Science.

» via Live Science

OOOOOOOMMMMMMGGGGGGg
 550
25 Mar 12 at 12 pm

moshita:

brain

Helmut Wicht

(Source: moshita)

tags: anatomy  brain  skull  gore 
moshita:

brain
Helmut Wicht
 247
12 Mar 12 at 6 pm

medicalschool:

Human brain frontal (coronal) section

The divisions of the brain are seen here in a Frontal (Coronal) Slice of the brain:

  1. Cerebrum
  2. Thalamus
  3. Mesencephalon - Midbrain
  4. Pons
  5. Medulla oblongata
  6. Medulla spinalis - Spinal cord
medicalschool:

Human brain frontal (coronal) section
The divisions of the brain are seen here in a Frontal (Coronal) Slice of the brain:
Cerebrum
Thalamus
Mesencephalon - Midbrain
Pons
Medulla oblongata
Medulla spinalis - Spinal cord
 105
12 Mar 12 at 6 pm

medicalschool:

Variations in Neuron Structure

Top row, left to right: Two multipolar neurons of the brain—a pyramidal cell and a Purkinje cell. Second row, left to right: Two bipolar neurons—a bipolar cell of the retina and an olfactory neuron. Third row: A unipolar neuron of the type involved in the senses of touch and pain. Bottom row: An anaxonic neuron (amacrine cell) of the retina.

medicalschool:

Variations in Neuron Structure
Top row, left to right: Two multipolar neurons of the brain—a pyramidal cell and a Purkinje cell. Second row, left to right: Two bipolar neurons—a bipolar cell of the retina and an olfactory neuron. Third row: A unipolar neuron of the type involved in the senses of touch and pain. Bottom row: An anaxonic neuron (amacrine cell) of the retina.
 21
04 Dec 11 at 1 pm

I am in love…

Systema is the best…

exogenerian:

Scientists are trying to understand how amnesiacs can lose all memory of their past life - and yet remember music. The answer may be that musical memories are stored in a special part of the brain.

When British conductor and musician Clive Wearing contracted a brain infection in 1985 he was left with a memory span of only 10 seconds.

The infection - herpes encephalitis - left him unable to recognize people he had seen or remember things that had been said just moments earlier.

But despite being acknowledged by doctors as having one of the most severe cases of amnesia ever, his musical ability and much of his musical memory was intact.

Read More

Music is a stimulus act, its controlled by the motor skills.  Given that control of a specific instrument is usually done with muscle memory, it makes that his brain doesn’t remember but his muscles do, the ears work similarly I guess :P

(Source: BBC)

 2726
21 Nov 11 at 4 pm

WORDS CANNOT BEGIN TO DESCRIBE THE BEAUTY OF THIS PHOTO!
IT WILL REMAIN UN-DESCRIBED! 
D: 

(Source: excisions, via articulomortis)

WORDS CANNOT BEGIN TO DESCRIBE THE BEAUTY OF THIS PHOTO!IT WILL REMAIN UN-DESCRIBED! D: 
 14
20 Nov 11 at 12 pm

Now researchers at UCLA have identified the group of neurons that mediates whether light arouses us — or not. Jerome Siegel, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and colleagues report in the current online edition of the Journal of Neuroscience that the cells necessary for a light-induced arousal response are located in the hypothalamus, an area at the base of the brain responsible for, among other things, control of the autonomic nervous system, body temperature, hunger, thirst, fatigue — and sleep.

These cells release a neurotransmitter called hypocretin, Siegel said. The researchers compared mice with and without hypocretin and found that those who didn’t have it were unable to stay awake in the light, while those who had it showed intense activation of these cells in the light but not while they were awake in the dark.

In the current study, researchers examined the behavioral capabilities of mice that had their hypocretin genetically “knocked-out” (KO mice) and compared them with the activities of normal, wild-type mice (WT) that still had their hypocretin neurons. The researchers tested the two groups while they performed a variety of tasks during both light and dark phases.

Surprisingly, they found that the KO mice were only deficient at working for positive rewards during the light phase. During the dark phase, however, these mice learned at the same rate as their WT littermates and were completely unimpaired in working for the same rewards.

Consistent with the data in the KO mice, the activity of hypocretin neurons in their WT littermates was maximized when working for positive rewards during the light phase, but the cells were not activated when performing the same tasks in the dark phase.

“The findings suggest that administering hypocretin and boosting the function of hypocretin cells will increase the light-induced arousal response,” Siegel said. “Conversely, blocking their function by administering hypocretin receptor blockers will reduce this response and thereby induce sleep.”

Further, Siegel noted, “The administration of hypocretin may also have antidepressant properties, and blocking it may increase tendencies toward depression. So we feel this work has implications for treating sleep disorders as well as depression.”

(Source: curiousgirl)

Brain cells responsible for keeping us awake identified.