14013
09 Mar 13 at 1 pm

salondelmal:

Street Fighter: Ghibli Edition

WHY DOESNT THIS EXIST?! WHYYYYY?!

(via dolce-principe-andree)

salondelmal:

Street Fighter: Ghibli Edition

WHY DOESNT THIS EXIST?! WHYYYYY?!
 23213
06 Mar 13 at 10 pm

escapekit:

Bodyscapes

“Israeli artist Ronit Bigal meticulously presents excerpts from sacred Biblical texts on the human body in her Body Scripture IIseries. Like Allan Teger’s Bodyscapes, Bigal gets in close to the contours of the human form, re-imagining the body as an abstract landscape. On the grooved, fleshy expanse, the artist systematically applies black Indian ink calligraphy in Hebrew that reveals passages of scripture.”

(via thelearningbrain)


03 Mar 13 at 7 pm

This article is a much needed one in the field of neurology and psychiatry. I’ve seen so much hype over the human connectome project. I’m fairly excited about it too. However it’s important that we tread lightly on this subject and don’t over hype it. Allegations have been said that visualizing a connectome will allow us to predict the actions or thoughts of human beings. This concept is wrong on so many levels. However I must disagree with the article when it states that funding this project is a waste of time. the human connectome project is essential for the development of neurology and psychiatry as a whole. imaging micro scale connections is vital for understanding underlying mechanisms essential to the field of psychiatry, advancements in this process may improve the effectiveness of prescription. This due to the fact that the main problem that surrounds the field of psychiatry is the fact that most drugs (such as antidepressants) only account for one mechanism of action, whereas diseases such as biologically based depression have many different mechanisms of occurring. Similarly, neurology can be greatly improved considering that the field of neurology is based on the study of brain structures and tissues.

Connectomics is flashy and gives you pretty pictures instead of tons of spike raster plots, but it's really over-hyped.
 2
03 Mar 13 at 7 pm

How awesome is this?

US doctors cure child born with HIV
 1584
03 Mar 13 at 6 pm

(Source: yougen, via starseedthoughts)

 402
02 Mar 13 at 5 pm

englishmajormade:

Here we go, Common Core. I have to admit, these DoK (Depth of Knowledge) levels are pretty awesome. I like the focus on increasing “cognitive rigor” to emphasize critical thinking instead of just fact learning. I’m scared for the shift away from fiction to make room for more nonfiction (in an English classroom). However, all of the examples I’ve seen for math, science, and social studies classrooms are fantastic, in my opinion. 

(Source: englishmajorinrepair, via thelearningbrain)

englishmajormade:

Here we go, Common Core. I have to admit, these DoK (Depth of Knowledge) levels are pretty awesome. I like the focus on increasing “cognitive rigor” to emphasize critical thinking instead of just fact learning. I’m scared for the shift away from fiction to make room for more nonfiction (in an English classroom). However, all of the examples I’ve seen for math, science, and social studies classrooms are fantastic, in my opinion. 
 2060
11 Feb 13 at 10 pm

phantasmag0r1a:

Since people seemed to like my last work.

Metatron’s Cube.

(via elcaminodelmedio)

phantasmag0r1a:

Since people seemed to like my last work.
Metatron’s Cube.
 38
11 Feb 13 at 10 pm

bpod-mrc:

Heart Shaped

The shape of the heart may not have changed in the 300 years since this anatomical picture was produced, but during that time, our understanding of how the heart functions and fails has changed beyond recognition. This engraving of a dissected human heart, published in 1739 by William Cowper, details the vessels, valves and heart chambers that we now know ensure blood is pumped efficiently from our lungs – delivering its precious cargo of oxygen around the body. But it was almost 200 years after this work of art appeared that scientific research really started to take shape, sketching the blueprint for today’s heart disease research. And now, in the 21st century, armed with a rich palette of research tools, scientists are adding ever more detail to the picture of how the heart works.

Written by Caroline Cross

Originally published under Creative Commons (CC-BY-NC-ND); Courtesy of Wellcome Library, London

bpod-mrc:

Heart Shaped
The shape of the heart may not have changed in the 300 years since this anatomical picture was produced, but during that time, our understanding of how the heart functions and fails has changed beyond recognition. This engraving of a dissected human heart, published in 1739 by William Cowper, details the vessels, valves and heart chambers that we now know ensure blood is pumped efficiently from our lungs – delivering its precious cargo of oxygen around the body. But it was almost 200 years after this work of art appeared that scientific research really started to take shape, sketching the blueprint for today’s heart disease research. And now, in the 21st century, armed with a rich palette of research tools, scientists are adding ever more detail to the picture of how the heart works.
Written by Caroline Cross
—
Originally published under Creative Commons (CC-BY-NC-ND); Courtesy of Wellcome Library, London
 91
11 Feb 13 at 10 pm

premierepage:

[Anatomie du nouveau-né ; les os du crâne et du bassin] 17e siècle

(via scientificillustration)

premierepage:

[Anatomie du nouveau-né ; les os du crâne et du bassin] 17e siècle